Teaser Tuesday #TuesdayBookBlog

Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by Jenn of Books And A Beat. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two or three “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Silent EBOOK copy

I am really excited at beginning to read Silent Water, Part Three of Jan Ruth’s tempestuous Wild Water saga.

The following sentences are from the Prologue.

As he began the ascent, the Irish Sea crashed and rolled against the headland and the old mine workings came into view, silhouetted against a band of rainclouds.  Which way?  The dogs had scattered.  He stopped and gasped for breath at the top of the track, and listened.

There was a noise that didn’t belong on that mountain.  A savage, inhuman noise.

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#AtoZChallenge Letter G

The theme of my challenge is poetry and books inspired by art and/or art inspired by literature.

G  is for The Goldfinch Carel_Fabritius_-_The_Goldfinch_-_WGA7721

“The Goldfinch” painted by Carel Fabritius in 1654 is a realistic picture of a bird chained to its perch.  It is normally exhibited in The Hague.  This tiny painting with its broad brushstrokes was already renowned before Donna Tartt published her book “The Goldfinch” in 2013.

 

book gold

When I started to read The Goldfinch, I found myself caught up in the enormity of the explosion which took Theo’s mother from him so suddenly and with the depth of love and attachment he had for her.  I wanted the best for him, as his mother would have wished but life constantly played tricks, despite his inventiveness.  The fact that he was carrying around an incredibly valuable painting, without discovery was symbolic, ironic, absurd.

This very long book contains a large cast of characters, good and evil, both caricatures and solid, believable people.  Boris the Russian teenager, with his doubtful morals, is both humorous and depressing.  The ethereal Pippa, whom Theo first saw before the explosion gives hope for his future as he travels from New York to Las Vegas and finally to Amsterdam.

I found the last part of the book incredibly disappointing and yet I had to read on.  Could Theo act for himself and escape the downward spiral?  Did The Goldfinch give him hope of escape?  That is for you to judge.

Incidentally, Carel Fabritius died in a massive gunpowder explosion, so the potential he showed was never fully achieved.

Link to a list of the other A to Z Challengers

Aurelia by Alison Morton

 

Aurelia

Aurelia is the fourth book in Alison Morton’s Roma Nova series. Set in an alternative historical context, the Roman Empire survives as a matriarchal society in a semi-mountainous area north of Italy. This is the only book I have read in this series so far, but it features a different character to those used in earlier volumes and works well as a stand-alone novel.

Written in the first person, Aurelia’s bold personality and brave, active life as a Major in the Praetorian Guard Special Forces engages the reader and promises plenty of action. But she is also a mother and the daughter of the head of one of the 12 ruling families. After Aurelia’s mother is involved in a severe car accident she must give up her military life and assume family and political responsibilities.

But soon Aurelia’s talents are put to use in diplomacy and espionage in the dangerous environment of Berlin, capital of Prussia. Here she encounters an old enemy and a mysterious stranger and she needs her wits about her. From then on the pace of the book is relentless and very exciting. Aurelia is the heroine we would all like to be.

I wasn’t sure if I would enjoy this storyline but I tried it out of curiosity. This alternative world, familiar to us and yet so different is a unique backdrop to a thriller which would make a wonderful film.

The Virgin of the Wind Rose by Glen Craney

Wind rose

The Virgin of the Wind Rose grips you in its teeth and whirls you through history and around the world. As soon as State Department employee, Jaq Quartermane, is told of the tragic death of her fiancé in Ethiopia she is dragged into a terrifying investigation rooted in the tales of the Knight Templars and the voyages of the explorers sponsored by Prince Henry the Navigator.

Finding herself in peril inside an ancient rock hewn Ethiopian church, does she trust to her deep Christian faith or to Elymas, an agnostic rascal? And it is trust and conspiracy which underline this thrilling adventure, taking Jaq from Rome to France, Portugal and Israel.

Bet-Abba-Libanos-church-Lalibela

While Jaq and Elymas try to solve the SATOR square, an ancient palindrome, their travels are paralleled by the story of three young 15th century Portuguese boys. Meeting in alarming circumstances, Pero, Zarco and Dias form a bond which carries them through their difficult training at the Tomar observatory and sustains them in their navigational test at Prince Henry’s fort in Sagres. Split apart by the different missions they are given, their friendship is maintained and their actions will have repercussions throughout history.

SATOR-AREPO-TENET-OPERA-ROTAS

I was fascinated by the details of early exploration, which has always interested me, and the further involvement of Christopher Columbus add to the intrigue. At the same time, I was anxious to continue following the mysteries and dangerous situations explored by the present day couple.  Glen Craney has made their relationship suitably prickly and intense, given their very different backgrounds, but he has allowed their humanity and understanding to shine through.

I loved Craney’s acerbic wit in comments such as, “The priest was obviously one pew short of a full congregation.” Naturally this novel will be compared to the books of Dan Brown but the quality of writing in The Virgin of the Wind Rose has the edge for me. Almost the best part is the last chapter with so much promise and fascinating clues.

Rosie's Book Review team 1

Teaser Tuesday #TuesdayBookBlog

Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of A Daily Rhythm. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two or three “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Wind rose

This week’s Teaser passages come from The Virgin of the Wind Rose by Glen Craney. Described as a Christopher Columbus mystery thriller, this book moves through the centuries in a complex, intriguing plot.

“Blind and lost she knew she couldn’t outrun them.  She climbed up the wall slots and slithered inside the highest burial niche.  Three shadows passed by with flashlights.  The beam stopped at the niche below her.

Slowly the voices receded. A door was bolted.”

My review will be posted next week.

 

Never Say Sorry by Rose Edmunds

Never say

Set in the world of corporate finance, Never Say Sorry could easily be very confusing to the average reader, but the ten characters who play major parts in the plot are all clearly drawn personalities, even if their motives are deliberately obtuse.  I particularly liked Brad, the global CEO of BEP Pharmaceuticals who made sure that he met his security consultant, Wayne, in various New Jersey diners so that he could eat the junk food denied him by his wife.

The heroine, Claudia is a larger than life, vibrant but prickly journalist, who intends to be noticed and to make her mark in her chosen career.  In contrast the hero, Hugh, is a rather wet behind the ears, lazy, pleasure-loving accountant.  And yet his failings make him likeable.

These two disparate characters are paired up, by accident of fate, against their initial instincts, to investigate pharmaceutical and financial fraud.  As they stumble towards the truth, they are both in grave danger as intrigue and deception leads to a thrilling conclusion.

Never Say Sorry was the first novel published by Rose Edmunds

Rose Edmunds

This is how she describes her career so far.

For more than 20 years I almost passed as normal in several well-known financial firms in London, working undercover to research my novels.

Currently, I’ve published two thrillers. Both are set in the world of high finance, but in essence the stories are about people and what motivates them – greed, fear, insecurity, ambition – the usual suspects. You will certainly recognize the personality types, whatever your walk of life.

 

I am looking forward to the return of Amy from Rose’s second novel Concealment which I reviewed here

Teaser Tuesday #TuesdayBookBlog

Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of A Daily Rhythm. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

 Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

I’ve almost finished reading Never say Sorry by Rose Edmunds, which is full of exciting events but what makes it compulsive reading are the characters. These are two of them:-

Stephanie Clark wore pastel suits and matching shoes- ill-judged female business attire from the early 80s.  A blonde helmet of hair sat stiffly on her head.

Claudia sat queen of all she surveyed- arms folded, feet up on the table.  And what a pair of legs- beautifully toned showcased in a pair of purple leather leggings with vertiginous gold sandals.

Never say

A review will follow shortly.