TeaserTuesday #TuesdayBookBlog

Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by Jenn of Books And A Beat. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two or three “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

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My current read is Trust Me by Leslie Pearse based on the lives of the many orphaned or poor children who were sent to Australia during the 20th century by religious charities.  There the young people were forced to work, mainly in horrific conditions with very little kindness.

Dulcie laughed.  “Yes, but where do men take their girlfriends down here?”

John leaned his elbow on the table and wiggled his fork at her, his eyes twinkling.  “Well it depends what kind of Sheila she is, Dulc.  There’s some you might take in the saloon bar for a few bevies, there’s some you have to take dancing.  I reckon with a Sheila like you, though, a bloke would be best to think of a walk along the sea-front holding her hand.”

Betty changed the subject and it wasn’t until the men had gone back to work, and she and Dulcie were washing up, that Dulcie brought it up again.

“Explain to me what Bruce and John were talking about?” she asked.

“Well, dear, there are different sorts of girls.”  Betty looked a bit embarrassed, drying the dishes very fast.  “There’s the nice girls, the bad ones and the in-betweens.   Nice girls are the ones they all want to marry, and they don’t take liberties with them.  They’ll take the bad ones drinking, knowing they can get their way with them, the in-betweens, well they’re in-between, they might be bad with the right bloke, and if he gives her a good enough time.  That’s the ones John said he’d take dancing.”

“So the nice girls only go for walks?  That sounds a bit dull!”

Betty gave her a sharp look.  “Better to be a bit dull than end up getting a reputation for being fast.  Young men have very strong urges, you go off smooching with one and there’s no-one about, anything can happen.”

Trust Me is available from Amazon

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On a Wing and a Prayer by Helen Carey #FridayBookShare @ShelleyWilson72

#FridayBookShare is a game created by Shelley Wilson to help search for an ideal read.

Anyone can have a go – all you need to do is answer the following questions based on the book you are currently reading/finished reading this week and use the hashtag #FridayBookShare

First line of the book.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

Introduce the main character using only three words.

Delightful design (add the cover image of the book).

Audience appeal (who would enjoy reading this book?)

Your favourite line/scene.

ON A WING AND A PRAYER by Helen Carey is a nostalgic and heart-warming novel of south London during the Second World War.  It is the third of Helen Carey’s Lavender Road series, but the only one I have read.

First Line    “So?” Angus McNaughton closed the interview room door, nodded at the military police  corporal waiting outside, then glanced at his assistant as they began to walk away down the long, grey-walled War Office Passage.  “What do you think, Helen?  A possibility?”     

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

October 1941. London has been ravaged by war for two years now and life couldn’t be tougher for those living on Lavender Road. Many loved ones have been lost and sacrifices made, but Lady Helen de Burrel is about to take the biggest risk yet.

Inspired by the courage of her friends on this south London street, Helen volunteers to join the Special Operations Executive and puts her life in jeopardy for the sake of her country. But it’s hard to know who to trust, and when her heart is on the line even love becomes dangerous.

The war has changed everything, but one thing is certain; the women of Lavender Road will rally together, no matter what the future has in store…

Introduce the main character –Helen is courageous, independent and considerate.

Delightful Design

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Audience appeal  For those who enjoy reading about twentieth century social history especially the role of women during wartime and also for its humour and romance.

Your favourite line/scene

It was only when she read the word Capotes scrawled on the fallen lid of the box that it dawned on her what the packets must contain.  What the English called French letters.  To her dismay she felt colour flood her cheeks.  She felt she had been standing there for hours when one of the men took pity on her.  Stepping forward from the doorway, he cupped his own hands under hers.

“Donnez-les moi, mademoiselle,” he murmured.  Then as she opened her hands and let the beastly things fall into his, he smiled.  “Ah yes, these should just about see me through the weekend.”

…………………………………………………………………..

One quick glance into his face had rendered her utterly tongue-tied.  She couldn’t look at him again.  The best she could manage was a gruff, “Merci,” as she edged away from him towards the door.

……………………………………………………………………

And then, as he glanced back at her, she knew at once.  It was his eyes.  Behind those dark lashes his gaze was self-possessed and direct.  She had never seen such strength of purpose reflected in someone’s eyes before.  He was clearly quite unfazed that she had seen him pocket some of the contraceptives.  He simply smiled faintly and nodded her a courteous, “Au revoir.”

Find the book on Amazon UK  and  US

If you want to join in, then answer the F.R.I.D.A.Y questions and use the Friday Book Share meme. Tag Shelley (@ShelleyWilson72) in, so she can read what you have added, too.

#FridayBookShare The Mystic Rose by Stephen Lawhead @ShelleyWilson72

#FridayBookShare is a game created by Shelley Wilson to help search for an ideal read.

Anyone can have a go – all you need to do is answer the following questions based on the book you are currently reading/finished reading this week and use the hashtag #FridayBookShare

First line of the book.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

Introduce the main character using only three words.

Delightful design (add the cover image of the book).

Audience appeal (who would enjoy reading this book?)

Your favourite line/scene.

The Mystic Rose is Book III in Stephen Lawhead‘s Celtic Crusades but it works well as a stand alone read and as an introduction to this prolific author.

First Line    A young woman of my acquaintance saw a ghost.  Ordinarily I would not have given such a melodramatic triviality even passing notice, save for two pertinent facts.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

A story rich in history and imagination, here is the final volume in Stephen R. Lawhead’s magnificent saga of a Scottish noble family and its divine quest during the age of the Great Crusades.

A thousand years after its disappearance, the Mystic Rose—the fabled Chalice of the Last Supper—has been found, and the warrior monks of the Knights Templar, led by the ruthless and corrupt Renaud de Bracineaux, will stop at nothing to possess it. One brave, dauntless, noblewoman stands in their way . . .

Born among the hills of Scotland, and raised on the Crusader tales of her grandfather, Murdo, and her father, Duncan, young Cait is determined to claim the Holy Cup for her own. Guided by a handful of clues gleaned from a stolen letter, Cait and a small band of knights follow a treacherous trail that leads from the shadowed halls of Saint Sophia into the heart of Moorish Spain and a world long unseen by Christian eyes. A journey whose end means victory . . . or death.

Introduce the main character –Caitlin is determined, resourceful and vengeful.

Delightful Design

Mystic Rose Mystic US

Audience appeal  To readers who like myths, legends and stories of the Knight Templars

Your favourite line/scene

The slender blade went spinning to the ground, and the bandit, seeing that she was unarmed, reached for the bridle of her horse.  Cait slashed the rains across his face, catching him on the side of his head as he leaned forward.  He drew back with a curse between his teeth, and jabbed at her with the sword.  She dodged aside easily and the bandit lunged forward, snagging the bridle strap of her mount.  She pulled back hard on the reins, attempting to make her horse rear, but the bandit clung on, keeping the animals head down.

The wild-eyed brute swung around beside her, thrusting the sword at her as he made to lead her horse away, taking her with him.  Throwing aside the reins, she slid lightly off the back of the horse, landed on her feet and started for the tent once more.

Find the book on Amazon UK or US

If you want to join in, then answer the F.R.I.D.A.Y questions and use the Friday Book Share meme. Tag Shelley (@ShelleyWilson72) in, so she can read what you have added, too.

#FridayBookShare After Dark by Haruki Murakami

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#FridayBookShare is a game created by Shelley Wilson to help search for an ideal read.

Anyone can have a go – all you need to do is answer the following questions based on the book you are currently reading/finished reading this week and use the hashtag #FridayBookShare

First line of the book.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

Introduce the main character using only three words.

Delightful design (add the cover image of the book).

Audience appeal (who would enjoy reading this book?)

Your favourite line/scene.

After Dark is the second book I have read by Haruki Murakami.  It is slim and easy to read but that doesn’t mean that it is easy to understand.

First Line  Eyes mark the shape of the city.  Through the eyes of a high flying night-bird, we take in the scene from midair.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

The midnight hour approaches in an almost empty all-night diner. Mari sips her coffee and glances up from a book as a young man, a musician, intrudes on her solitude. Both have missed the last train home. The musician has plans to rehearse with his jazz band all night, Mari is equally unconcerned and content to read, smoke and drink coffee until dawn. They realise they’ve been acquainted through Eri, Mari’s beautiful sister. The musician soon leaves with a promise to return before dawn. Shortly afterwards Mari will be interrupted a second time by a girl from the Alphaville Hotel; a Chinese prostitute has been hurt by a client, the girl has heard Mari speaks fluent Chinese and requests her help.

Meanwhile Eri is at home and sleeps a deep, heavy sleep that is ‘too perfect, too pure’ to be normal; pulse and respiration at the lowest required level. She has been in this soporfic state for two months; Eri has become the classic myth – a sleeping beauty. But tonight as the digital clock displays 00:00 a faint electrical crackle is perceptible, a hint of life flickers across the TV screen, though the television’s plug has been pulled.

Murakami, acclaimed master of the surreal, returns with a stunning new novel, where the familiar can become unfamiliar after midnight, even to those that thrive in small hours. With After Dark we journey beyond the twilight. Strange nocturnal happenings, or a trick of the night?

Introduce the main character –Enigmatic, solitary, observer.

Delightful Design

After Dark

Audience appeal  Curious, adventurous readers

Your favourite line/scene

All of a sudden out of nowhere I can bring back things I haven’t thought about for years.  It’s pretty interesting.  Memory is so crazy!  It’s like we’ve got these drawers crammed with tons of useless stuff.  Meanwhile all the really important things we just keep forgetting, one after the other.

It’s because I can pull the memories out of the drawers when I have to- the important ones and the useless ones- that I can go on living this nightmare of a life.

You can find After Dark on Amazon here

If you want to join in, then answer the F.R.I.D.A.Y questions and use the Friday Book Share meme. Tag Shelley (@ShelleyWilson72) in, so she can read what you have added, too.

 

#AugustReviews ~because every little helps :) @TerryTyler4

Reblogged from http://terrytyler59.blogspot.co.uk/2016/07/augustreviews-because-every-little-helps.html

August 2016 is Write An Amazon Review Month!

On Monday 25th July, book blogger Rosie Amber wrote this post encouraging readers and writers alike to post a short review on Amazon for any book they’ve read and enjoyed ~ following this up, I’m starting this initiative along with other writer-bloggers including Rosie, Cathy from Between The Lines, Barb Taub, Shelley Wilson and Alison Williams.

The idea is that, during August, everyone who reads this uses their Amazon account to post just one review on one book that they’ve read (but feel free to carry on if you get in the swing!). You don’t even have to have read it recently, it can be any book you’ve read, any time. The book does not have to have been purchased from Amazon, though if it is you get the ‘Verified Purchase’ tag on it; however, if you download all your books via Kindle Unlimited, as many do these days, they don’t show the VP tag, anyway.

Remember, this isn’t the Times Literary Supplement, it’s Amazon, where ordinary people go to choose their next £1.99 Kindle book. No one expects you to write a thousand word, in-depth critique; I don’t know about you, but I’m more likely to read one short paragraph or a couple of lines saying what an average reader thought of a book, than a long-winded essay about the pros and cons of the various literary techniques used. Yes, those are welcome too (!), but no more so than a few words saying “I loved this book, I was up reading it until 3am”, or “I loved Jim and Vivien and the dialogue was so realistic”, or whatever!

Book-Review

Why should you write a review?
  • They help book buyers make decisions.  Don’t you read the reviews on Trip Advisor before deciding on a hotel, or any site from which you might buy an item for practical use?  Book reviews are no different.
  • If the book is by a self-published author, or published by an independent press, the writers have to do all their promotion and marketing themselves ~ reviews from the reading public is their one free helping hand.
  • The amount of reviews on Amazon helps a book’s visibility (allegedly).  If you love a writer’s work and want others to do so, too, this is the best possible way of making this happen.
  • It’s your good deed for the day, and will only take five minutes!
 Off we go, then!  A few more pointers:
  • If you need any help with writing your review, do click on Rosie’s post, above.
  • A review can be as short as one word.  The shortest one I have is just two 🙂
  • You don’t have to put your name to the review, as your Amazon ‘handle’ can be anything you like.
  • No writer expects all their reviews to be 5* and say the book is the best thing ever written; there is a star rating guide on Rosie’s post.
  • Would you like to tell the Twittersphere about your review?  If so, tweet the link to it with the hashtag #AugustReviews ~ and thank you!  I will do one blog post a week featuring these links: The #AugustReviews Hall of Fame (thank you, Barb!).
 August Reviews Hall of Fame

If you have a blog and would like to spread the word about #AugustReviews, please feel free to copy and paste this blog post, provide the link to it, re-blog it, or whatever ~ many thanks, and I hope you will join in to make this idea a success 🙂

#FridayBookShare The Ares File by Andrew French

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#FridayBookShare is a game created by Shelley Wilson to help search for an ideal read.

Anyone can have a go – all you need to do is answer the following questions based on the book you are currently reading/finished reading this week and use the hashtag #FridayBookShare

First line of the book.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

Introduce the main character using only three words.

Delightful design (add the cover image of the book).

Audience appeal (who would enjoy reading this book?)

Your favourite line/scene.

The Ares File is the second of the Michael Prentiss series by Andrew French

First Line  Fiona Mabbitt was usually a heavy sleeper and quite accustomed to being in the house on her own at night.  After all she had been an army officer’s wife all her married life and had long since accepted that she would sometimes have to spend long periods apart from her husband.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

When the wife of the commanding officer of a secret intelligence unit is murdered at home during a burglary to steal a top secret file, a chain of events is set in motion to hide one man’s guilty secret. Michael Prentiss is once again unwillingly drawn into the dark world of murder and deceit. He must discover who has taken the file and recover it before becoming an assassin’s next target.

Introduce the main character – Secretive, trustworthy, lonely

Delightful Design

Ares

Audience appeal   Men and women who enjoy action adventure without too much gore and with a human touch.

Your favourite line/scene

Two minutes later the door opened and two familiar faces entered the interview room.  Chief Inspector Gallagher and Sergeant Lyle pulled out the chairs opposite and sat down.  Jordan forced a smile,   “Well if it’s not Simon and Garfunkel.  No, it’s Peters and Lee.”  Gallagher didn’t respond to Jordan’s sarcastic attempt at humour.

Find the book on Amazon UK or US

If you want to join in, then answer the F.R.I.D.A.Y questions and use the Friday Book Share meme. Tag Shelley (@ShelleyWilson72) in, so she can read what you have added, too.

 

Rusty Gold by Christine Campbell

Rusty

Rusty Gold is Book 3 of the stories of Mirabelle, the Reluctant Detective.  In Book 1 we had seen, Mirabelle’s daughter, Summer, choose to leave home without warning.  We followed the search for her all over Edinburgh and Mirabelle’s determination to find her daughter despite her sorrow and fears.  In the second book, Mirabelle has become the person, people in the area seek out, when they are searching for missing family members but in Rusty Gold, after four and a half years have passed, she has lost the confidence and wish to go on investigating for others.  She sacks her volunteer assistant, Kay, and wallows in her loneliness.

 

But other people don’t give up on Mirabelle.  Her larger than life determination and personality need to be revived and the turning point is when she hears that the dying mother of her long lost friend, Esme, needs her help.  Esme and her young friend, are in great danger, travelling around the island of Skye in an old campervan, unaware that dangerous criminals are after them.  Encouraged by the return of Detective Inspector Sam Burns into her life, Mirabelle asks Kay to accompany her and the two unlikely heroines try to save the day.

 

This book draws many threads from the earlier books together and we finally learn the full story of Summer’s conception and birth and how much Mirabelle loved her, despite her inability to be a good mother.  But the last few chapters are a thrilling adventure among the beautiful countryside of Skye, where all the women in this character driven series come into their own.  There is definitely a conclusion but there are also hints of further investigations for Mirabelle.  It is difficult to think of any other books quite like these and they could ideally be turned into a TV series.

Rosie's Book Review team 1