The Redoubtable Miss Fisher #amreading #BookReview #TVcrime

Miss-Fisher-s-Murder-mysteries

I have recently become a fan of the wonderful Miss Fisher mysteries on TV. Set in Melbourne during the 1920s, the programmes show beautiful architecture and clothes to die for. The plots are reminiscent of Miss Marple or Agatha Raisin so I decided it was time to read one of the many books about this incredible heroine.

Looking for a story I had not seen on television I chose Book 9, Raisins and Almonds.

Raisins & Almonds

Phryne Fisher is a wealthy single woman with a busy household including two adopted daughters, Ebony the cat, Molly the puppy and her staff. Elegantly dressed, at all times, Miss Fisher is a passionate, pleasure loving woman who strives for justice, using her intellect to solve crimes which defeat the police force. She takes in waifs and strays because she remembers poverty in her childhood and her wealth has not made her proud or snobbish.

This mystery centres on the busy Eastern Market, where the victim has been murdered with strychnine, in a book shop belonging to Miss Lee. Detective Inspector Jack Robinson, a less attractive character than he appears in the TV series, immediately arrests Miss Lee as the chief suspect, but Phryne’s help is enlisted by Miss Lee’s Jewish landlord, Mr Abrahams, to find the real culprit. Embarking on an intimate love affair with Mr Abraham’s beautiful young son, Miss Fisher also explores the Jewish community and the dabbling in alchemy by those studying the Kabbalah.

Aided by her reliable assistant, Dot, and handy Jacks of all trades, Bert and Cec, while being consulted unofficially by Inspector Robinson, Phryne makes progress but brings herself and those she loves into danger. The author has thoroughly researched ancient Jewish beliefs as well as the problems of living in an anti-Semitic society.

The author has a witty turn of phrase and has created delightful characters. This mystery is an easy read, with an imaginative plot and a novel setting.

Raisins and Almonds is available at Amazon UK

Kerry

Kerry Greenwood

Kerry Greenwood was born in the Melbourne suburb of Footscray and after wandering far and wide, she returned to live there. She has a degree in English and Law from Melbourne University and was admitted to the legal profession on the 1st April 1982, a day which she finds both soothing and significant.

Kerry has written twenty novels, a number of plays, including The Troubadours with Stephen D’Arcy, is an award-winning children’s writer and has edited and contributed to several anthologies. In 1996 she published a book of essays on female murderers called Things She Loves: Why women Kill.

The Phryne Fisher series (pronounced Fry-knee, to rhyme with briny) began in 1989 with Cocaine Blues which was a great success. Kerry has written thirteen books in this series with no sign yet of Miss Fisher hanging up her pearl-handled pistol. Kerry says that as long as people want to read them, she can keep writing them.

Kerry Greenwood has worked as a folk singer, factory hand, director, producer, translator, costume-maker, cook and is currently a solicitor. When she is not writing, she works as a locum solicitor for the Victorian Legal Aid. She is also the unpaid curator of seven thousand books, three cats (Attila, Belladonna and Ashe) and a computer called Apple (which squeaks). She embroiders very well but cannot knit. She has flown planes and leapt out of them (with a parachute) in an attempt to cure her fear of heights (she is now terrified of jumping out of planes but can climb ladders without fear). She can detect second-hand bookshops from blocks away and is often found within them.

For fun Kerry reads science fiction/fantasy and detective stories. She is not married, has no children and lives with a registered wizard. When she is not doing any of the above she stares blankly out of the window.

The Importance of Being Seven by Alexander McCall Smith #FridayBookShare ~ @ShelleyWilson72

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#FridayBookShare is a game created by Shelley Wilson to help search for an ideal read.

Anyone can have a go – all you need to do is answer the following questions based on the book you are currently reading/finished reading this week and use the hashtag #FridayBookShare

First line of the book.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

Introduce the main character using only three words.

Delightful design (add the cover image of the book).

Audience appeal (who would enjoy reading this book?)

Your favourite line/scene.

The different way in which adults and children look at life, has always fascinated me and I am always horrified that some adults believe the opinions of children are of no importance.  Alexander McCall Smith demonstrates this so clearly in the relationship between Bertie and his mother in his Scotland Street books, especially The Importance of Being Seven

First Line:  If there was one thing about marriage that surprised Matthew, it was just how quickly he became accustomed to it.

Recruit fans by adding the blurb

Despite inhabiting a great city renowned for its impeccable restraint, the extended family of 44 Scotland Street is trembling on the brink of reckless self-indulgence. Matthew and Elspeth receive startling – and expensive – news on a visit to the Infirmary, Angus and Domenica are contemplating an Italian ménage a trois, and even Big Lou is overheard discussing cosmetic surgery. But when Bertie Pollock – six years old and impatient to be seven – mislays his meddling mother Irene one afternoon, a valuable lesson is learned: that wish-fulfilment is a dangerous business.

Warm-hearted, wise and very funny, The Importance of Being Seven brings us a fresh and delightful set of insights into philosophy and fraternity among Edinburgh’s most loveable residents.

Introduce the main character  Bertie is highly intelligent, very polite and longs to escape from his mother.

Delightful Design

being-seven

Audience appeal:  Anyone with a sense of humour and a philosophical attitude to life.

Your Favourite Scene

Bertie would have liked to play games, but it seemed there was little time for such things, what with yoga sessions, his psychotherapy with Dr St Clair, Italian conversazione with his mother and his saxophone lessons.  He had asked his mother whether he could give up some of these but she had been unwilling.

“But you love all these things that Mummy plans for you, Bertie!” she replied.  “All of them.  You have such fun, and you’ll thank me, when you are a big boy for helping you to do all these things.”

Bertie did not think that he would, but he knew that there was no point in arguing. His mother was so sure of everything.  He had suggested that he might give up his weekly psychotherapy session with Dr St Clair.

“Dr St Clair is helping you a lot you know.  He’s helping to make sure that you make the right decisions.  He’s helping you to understand things – to grow up without neuroses. You’re a lucky little boy to have this opportunity.  There are quite a few young people who could do with his help.”

“Such as?” asked Bertie.

“Well, Tofu, for one.  There’s a young man who needs a lot of help to curb his aggressive urges.”

Bertie had to agree but he did not think that Dr St Clair would be a match for Tofu. Tofu would never agree to go to yoga and would resolutely refuse to play the saxophone or to speak Italian.  Tofu was a member of Bertie’s cub scout pack as was his arch-enemy, Olive.  And that was difficult.  Tofu had already spoken to Bertie about that evening’s meeting.

“There’s going to be trouble, Bertie.” he said. “I can feel it coming.”  Then he added, “Hah!”

 

If you want to join in, then answer the F.R.I.D.A.Y questions and use the Friday Book Share meme. Tag Shelley (@ShelleyWilson72) in, so she can read what you have added, too.

#FridayBookShare ~ Emotionally Weird by Kate Atkinson @ShelleyWilson72

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#FridayBookShare is a game created by Shelley Wilson to help search for an ideal read.

Anyone can have a go – all you need to do is answer the following questions based on the book you are currently reading/finished reading this week and use the hashtag #FridayBookShare

First line of the book.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

Introduce the main character using only three words.

Delightful design (add the cover image of the book).

Audience appeal (who would enjoy reading this book?)

Your favourite line/scene.

Ever since I discovered Case Histories many years ago I have been a great fan of Kate Atkinson.  Emotionally Weird is one of her early books, set in Dundee, which I read appropriately while staying in Dundee, although that is not necessary.

First Line   My mother is a virgin (trust me) my mother Nora- A fiery Caledonian beacon- says she is untouched by the hand of man and is as pure as Joan of Arc or the snow on the Grampians.

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On a peat and heather island off the west coast of Scotland, Effie and her mother Nora take refuge in the large mouldering house of their ancestors and tell each other stories.

Nora, at first, recounts nothing that Effie really wants to hear, like who her father was – variously Jimmy, Jack, or Ernie. Effie tells of her life at college in Dundee, where she lives in a lethargic relationship with Bob, a student who never goes to lectures, seldom gets out of bed, and to whom the Klingons are as real as the French and the Germans (more real than the Luxemburgers).

But strange things are happening. Why is Effie being followed? Why is everyone writing novels? Is someone killing the old people? And where is the mysterious yellow dog?

Introduce the main character – Effie is an observer, a novelist, a wordsmith.

Delightful Design

emotionally-weird

Audience appeal  This might appeal to those who are familiar with Atkinson’s recent novels or more to those who like absurdity such as Flann O’Brien’s books.  You are taken back to 1970s student life.

Your Favourite Scene

I was sitting next to Terri- a black wolf prowling the night.  Terri’s assignment for Martha was poetry.  Terri’s poems came under the collective title My Favourite Suicide and you can probably imagine the content matter.  Some of them (although undoubtedly derivative) were surprisingly cheerful-

I drank the glass of

milk you left on the

bedside table. It was

sour, thank you

Martha was wearing a long cashmere plaid woven from the dull colours of infinity, that she had fixed, toga-style, with a claw of some bird, a grouse or a ptarmigan maybe, set with a purple amethyst.

Andrea was making a great show of sharpening her pencils and laying everything out on her little table while Kevin was staring at the space Olivia’s feet would have occupied if she had been there.

“I think we should begin with a little exercise to flex our writing muscles,” Martha said, speaking very slowly as if she was on prescription drugs but I think it was just her way of trying to communicate with people less intelligent than she thought she was.

“Write me a paragraph,” Martha enunciated clearly, in just 10 minutes, which incorporates these three word bractate, trowel and vilifies.”

If you want to join in, then answer the F.R.I.D.A.Y questions and use the Friday Book Share meme. Tag Shelley (@ShelleyWilson72) in, so she can read what you have added, too.

#FridayBookShare The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde

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#FridayBookShare is a game created by Shelley Wilson to help search for an ideal read.

Anyone can have a go – all you need to do is answer the following questions based on the book you are currently reading/finished reading this week and use the hashtag #FridayBookShare

First line of the book.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

Introduce the main character using only three words.

Delightful design (add the cover image of the book).

Audience appeal (who would enjoy reading this book?)

Your favourite line/scene.

The Eyre Affair is the first of a series of books by Jasper Fforde about Thursday Next

First Line  My father had a face that could stop a clock.  I don’t mean that he was ugly or anything; it was just a phrase the ChronoGuard used to describe someone who had the power to reduce time to an ultra-slow tickle.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

There is another 1985, somewhere in the could-have-been, where the Crimean war still rages, dodos are regenerated in home-cloning kits and everyone is deeply disappointed by the ending of ‘Jane Eyre’. In this world there are no jet-liners or computers, but there are policemen who can travel across time, a Welsh republic, a great interest in all things literary – and a woman called Thursday Next.

In this utterly original and wonderfully funny first novel, Fforde has created a fiesty, loveable heroine and a plot of such richness and ingenuity that it will take your breath away.

Introduce the main character –Zany, fearless, detective.

Delightful Design

Eyre Aff

 

Audience appeal  Anyone with an interest in literature and who likes the absurd combined with surprising exciting events.

Your favourite line/scene

I pushed open the front gate with some difficulty because of the assortment of dodos who had gathered eagerly around to see who it was and then plocked excitedly when they realised it was someone vaguely familiar.

“Hello Mordecai,” I said to the oldest, who dipped and bobbed in greeting.

Find the book on Amazon UK or US

If you want to join in, then answer the F.R.I.D.A.Y questions and use the Friday Book Share meme. Tag Shelley (@ShelleyWilson72) in, so she can read what you have added, too.

#FridayBookShare Framed by Frank Cottrell Boyce

#FridayBookShare is a game created by Shelley Wilson to help search for an ideal read.

Anyone can have a go – all you need to do is answer the following questions based on the book you are currently reading/finished reading this week and use the hashtag #FridayBookShare

First line of the book.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

Introduce the main character using only three words.

Delightful design (add the cover image of the book).

Audience appeal (who would enjoy reading this book?)

Your favourite line/scene.

Framed was a book I first bought for my school library many years ago but which I wanted to return to as a relief from all the angst in the UK currently.

First Line  My dad, right- ask anyone this, they’ll all say the same- my dad can fix anything; Toyota, Hyundai, Ford. Even Nice Tom’s Mam’s diddy Daihatsu which is about the size of a marshmallow so you need tweezers to fix it.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

The perfect crime – it’s a work of art, in Frank Cottrell Boyce’s ingenious story, Framed.

Dylan is the only boy living in the tiny Welsh town of Manod. His parents run the Snowdonia Oasis Auto Marvel garage – and when he’s not trying to persuade his sisters to play football, Dylan is in charge of the petrol log. And that means he gets to keep track of everyone coming in and out of Manod – what car they drive, what they’re called, even their favourite flavour of crisps. But when a mysterious convoy of lorries trundles up the misty mountainside towards an old, disused mine, even Dylan is confounded. Who are these people – and what have they got to hide?

A story inspired by a press cutting describing how, during World War II, the treasured contents of London’s National Gallery were stored in Welsh slate mines. Once a month, a morale-boosting masterpiece would be unveiled in the village and then returned to London for viewing. This is a funny and touching exploration of how Art – its beauty and its value – touches the life of one little boy and his big family in a very small town.

Introduce the main character –  Eccentric boy thief

Delightful Design

 

new Frame

Audience appeal   Age 9 plus including me!  It might help if you can remember Teenage Mutant Ninja  Turtles.

Your favourite line/scene

The Misses Sellwood live on a farm halfway up Manod Mountain.  Miss Elsa can drive but she can’t see.  Miss Edna can see but she can’t drive.  So what they do is, every Wednesday Miss Elsa drives and Miss Edna steers.  It’s not so risky on the mountain road because no-one lives up there apart from them and Mr Morgan’s sheep, but when they hit the High Street, they are a Menace to Society.

If you want to join in, then answer the F.R.I.D.A.Y questions and use the Friday Book Share meme. Tag Shelley (@ShelleyWilson72) in, so she can read what you have added, too.

#FridayBookShare The Shepherd’s Crown by Terry Pratchett

#FridayBookShare is a game created by Shelley Wilson to help search for an ideal read.

Anyone can have a go – all you need to do is answer the following questions based on the book you are currently reading/finished reading this week and use the hashtag #FridayBookShare

First line of the book.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

Introduce the main character using only three words.

Delightful design (add the cover image of the book).

Audience appeal (who would enjoy reading this book?)

Your favourite line/scene.

I have finally started to read The Shepherd’s Crown, Terry Pratchett’s last book.

First LineIt was born in the darkness of the Circle Sea; at first just a soft floating thing, washed back and forth by tide after tide.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

A SHIVERING OF WORLDS

Deep in the Chalk, something is stirring. The owls and the foxes can sense it, and Tiffany Aching feels it in her boots. An old enemy is gathering strength.

This is a time of endings and beginnings, old friends and new, a blurring of edges and a shifting of power. Now Tiffany stands between the light and the dark, the good and the bad.

As the fairy horde prepares for invasion, Tiffany must summon all the witches to stand with her. To protect the land. Her land.

There will be a reckoning . . .

THE FINAL DISCWORLD NOVEL

Introduce the main character  –Listener, Midwife, Witch.

Delightful Design

Shepherd

Audience appeal  –Anyone with a good sense of humour and a love of the absurd.

Your favourite line/scene

“Dear sir, Mister Feegle,” said Mrs Earwig.  “This is a council of war, so we should be discussing strategies and tactics.”

“Ah weel, ye can if ye wish, but we are Feegles and we dinnae mess about wi’ things like that.  It’s all aboot usin’ yon claymore to best offence.  And if ye dinnae get that right, your last resort is to nut ’em.

Tiffany took in Mrs Earwig’s face and said cheerfully, “Could you do that, Mrs Earwig?”

She was given a Look, and Mrs Earwig said, “I will nut as I see fit.”  And to Tiffany’s surprise, the other witches applauded, and for once Mrs Earwig was wreathed in smiles.

If you want to join in, then answer the F.R.I.D.A.Y questions and use the Friday Book Share meme. Tag Shelley (@ShelleyWilson72) in, so she can read what you have added, too.

Madam Tulip by David Ahern

Madam Tulip

Derry O’Donnell is a fully qualified, out of work actress who lives in Dublin.  Her father, Jacko, is a charming artist, fond of gambling, while her mother, Vanessa, is an assertive, successful Gallery owner in New York.

 

Derry’s friend, Bella, suggests that Derry uses her psychic talents, as the daughter of a seventh son of a seventh son, to create the persona of a mystic called Madam Tulip.  After meeting a friend of Jacko at a race course, Derry is persuaded by supermodel Marlene O’Mara to give Madam Tulip her first performance, giving consultations and predictions to clients at a Charity Bash taking place in a castle, the following weekend.  Among the guests are Mojo, a rapper from London and his partner Sony a Dee, an American R n B singer.

 

Derry finds Bruce, an old friend and also a “resting” actor, working at the castle.  In addition, he is an ex US navy SEAL with special skills which she will soon need to rely on.  Mojo is found dead in suspicious circumstances and Bella is arrested.  When it looks as though Derry might also be framed for murder, she decides to find the real culprit, but she is hindered by the lack of co-operation of her old flame, Fitz, an aristocratic policeman from London, who is working incognito.

 

Derry is a brave, likeable heroine, who inspires loyalty from her friends.  She relishes danger, although unsure of the advantage of her ability to sense people’s secrets and predict consequences.  The second half of the novel is full of drama and adventure.  It is clear that Derry or Madam Tulip could continue with other thrilling investigations since you can trust her and enjoy her sardonic humour.

 

This story fits into the “cozy mystery” genre but there is also a touch of Irish feyness which reminds me of the books of David’s namesake, Cecelia Ahern.  A most enjoyable read.

Rosie's Book Review team 1