#FridayBookShare ~ The Last Runaway by Tracy Chevalier @ShelleyWilson72

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 #FridayBookShare is a game created by Shelley Wilson to help search for an ideal read.

Anyone can have a go – all you need to do is answer the following questions based on the book you are currently reading/finished reading this week and use the hashtag #FridayBookShare

First line of the book.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

Introduce the main character using only three words.

Delightful design (add the cover image of the book).

Audience appeal (who would enjoy reading this book?)

Your favourite line/scene.

The Last Runaway by Tracy  Chevalier

First Line   She could not go back.  When Honor Bright abruptly announced to her family that she would accompany her sister Grace to America- she thought: I can always come back.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

When modest Quaker Honor Bright sails from Bristol with her sister, she is fleeing heartache for a new life in America, far from home. But tragedy leaves her alone and vulnerable, torn between two worlds and dependent on the kindness of strangers.

Life in 1850s Ohio is precarious and unsentimental. The sun is too hot, the thunderstorms too violent, the snow too deep. The roads are spattered with mud and spit. The woods are home to skunks and porcupines and raccoons. They also shelter slaves escaping north to freedom.

Should Honor hide runaways from the ruthless men who hunt them down? The Quaker community she has joined may oppose slavery in principle, but does it have the courage to help her defy the law? As she struggles to find her place and her voice, Honor must decide what she is willing to risk for her beliefs.

Set in the tangled forests and sunlit cornfields of Ohio, Tracy Chevalier’s vivid novel is the story of bad men and spirited women, surprising marriages and unlikely friendships, and the remarkable power of defiance.

Introduce the main character – Honor is modest and brave but, an outsider.

Delightful Design

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Audience appeal   This book is very difficult to pigeonhole.  If you are interested in the role of women in the history of the American settlers and would like to know more about how runaway slaves were helped to escape to Canada then you must read this book.

Your favourite line/scene

The one thing I am truly valued for here is my sewing and quilting.  Judith has handed over all of the sewing and I have happily taken it.  At several of the frolics I have been asked to quilt the centre panel, as that is the one most noticed on a bed.

I am now working on a quilt for Dorcas to replace one of those she gave me for my marriage.  Judith told Dorcas to let me decide what is best.  In that one area, then, I am my own mistress.

I expect by now Mother will have asked thee for the Star of Bethlehem quilt I gave thee before leaving for America.  I was ashamed to have to ask for it back, but I know my dearest friend will understand.  Circumstances have led me to marry much sooner than expected, and I was not ready, in terms of quilts – and other ways too.

If you want to join in, then answer the F.R.I.D.A.Y questions and use the Friday Book Share meme. Tag Shelley (@ShelleyWilson72) in, so she can read what you have added, too.

#FridayBookShare ~Falling Pomegranate Seeds by Wendy J Dunn

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#FridayBookShare is a game created by Shelley Wilson to help search for an ideal read.

Anyone can have a go – all you need to do is answer the following questions based on the book you are currently reading/finished reading this week and use the hashtag #FridayBookShare

First line of the book.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

Introduce the main character using only three words.

Delightful design (add the cover image of the book).

Audience appeal (who would enjoy reading this book?)

Your favourite line/scene.

Falling Pomegranate Seeds : The Duty of Daughters by Wendy J Dunn is Book 1 of her series about Katherine of Aragon

First Line    Dona Beatriz Galindo caught her breath and tidied her habito.  She shook her head a little when she noticed ink-stained fingers and several spots of black ink on the front of her green gown.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

Dońa Beatriz Galindo.
Respected scholar.
Tutor to royalty.
Friend and advisor to Queen Isabel of Castile.

Beatriz is an uneasy witness to the Holy War of Queen Isabel and her husband, Ferdinand, King of Aragon. A Holy War seeing the Moors pushed out of territories ruled by them for centuries.

The road for women is a hard one. Beatriz must tutor the queen’s youngest child, Catalina, and equip her for a very different future life. She must teach her how to survive exile, an existence outside the protection of her mother. She must prepare Catalina to be England’s queen.

A tale of mothers and daughters, power, intrigue, death, love, and redemption. In the end, Falling Pomegranate Seeds sings a song of friendship and life.

Introduce the main character Beatriz is intelligent, loving and observant

Delightful Design

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Audience appeal   An inside account of the renowned court of Ferdinand and Isabella revealing the tragic and fascinating family life of the young Katherine of Aragon, when politics could cost you your life.  

Your favourite line/scene 

At dawn, Beatriz stood with Catalina and Maria on the terraced roof of the Tower of Comares. Rivulets of white gold streamed through feathery clouds, the deluge of light from a rising sun turning the snowy top of Sierra Nevada aflame, continuing to the near fortress hill.  On the last morning with her girls at the Alhambra, the scent of oranges and pomegranates, and a silver morning wove together a vivid design of poignant farewell.

“Of all the places I have lived, I love here the best. ‘Tis my heart’s true home.”  Beatriz squeezed Calatalina’s hand.  “All will be well.”

Catalina looked at the sky.  “Will England have dawns as beautiful as this?  I want to imprint it on my memory so I never forget.”

If you want to join in, then answer the F.R.I.D.A.Y questions and use the Friday Book Share meme. Tag Shelley (@ShelleyWilson72) in, so she can read what you have added, too.

#Bookreview of The Tea Rose by Jennifer Donnelly

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Last week I gave you a taster of my current read The Tea Rose by Jennifer Donnelly.  Here is my review:-

I have very mixed feelings about this book.  After reading A Gathering Light I had great expectations of The Tea Rose but sadly it is not a novel of quality, merely a good yarn.  Starting in 1888 the story moves from Whitechapel, London to New York.  Heroine Fiona Finnegan, a poor worker in a tea factory experiences one tragedy after another until the dastardly villain causes her to run away to America.  Believing she has been abandoned by her sweetheart, Joe, she teams up with kind, ineffectual aristocrat, Nick, and gradually moves from rags to riches.

I was very concerned by the vocabulary.  No-one in London or New York would talk constantly of, “going to the Loo,” in the 1880s and “going for a date” and “brainstorm” were not words of that time either.  There are many convenient happenchances and the murders of Jack the Ripper are included to tempt readers to pick up the book, but Jennifer Donnolly is at her best when using her own imagination to create an amazing twist in the plot.  It is for this reason that I carried on reading to the end, though the melodramatic conclusion wasn’t really necessary.

So if you can suspend your disbelief and lose yourself in a tale of good and evil with a strong heroine, without questioning historical accuracy, then this is an enjoyable tale, but I won’t be continuing with this trilogy.

I would add the caveat that A Gathering Light by Jennifer Donnelly is well worth reading.

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Teaser Tuesday #TuesdayBookBlog

Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by Jenn of Books And A Beat. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two or three “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

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I am currently reading The Tea Rose by Jennifer Donnelly which appealed to me because the first half is set in London in 1888 where an Irish family struggle to live working as a docker, laundress and a tea packer. For Fiona her life goes from bad to worse until circumstances take her to New York.

Fiona stared at the stark wooden markers sticking out of the snow dusted ground.  On the left, her father’s, already weathered by the elements.  Next to his, her mother’s and the baby’s, just starting to darken.  And a brand new one, the wooden cross still pale.

And then he saw them.  Tea roses.  Hundreds and hundreds of them.  The entire backyard was full of them, sprawling over walls and pathways, basking and preening in the sunshine.

The Tea Rose is the first book of a series available from Amazon UK or Amazon US

 

The Devil You Know by Terry Tyler #bookreview

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When serial killers are finally arrested, people are usually amazed by how normal the culprit seemed to be, but surely their nearest and dearest had suspicions. In fact, some folk must have secretly suspected that they knew the murderer but dared not voice their thoughts.

In Terry Tyler’s book, The Devil You Know, five people start to believe that someone they know well may be the killer because of his deceit, or his inexplicable or unpleasant behaviour. As a reader, I was intrigued and unable to deduce which, or even if any of the five candidates might be the murderer. The novel includes some exceedingly nasty characters and sad, unfortunate victims. It also shows us many aspects of society, such as exploited young women from Eastern Europe, a bullying husband and a pragmatic, helpful teacher.

When the mystery is solved, despite the surprise revelation, it all begins to fall into place. The unexplained actions of several characters are revealed to be the result of their human failings. The part of the book which I most enjoyed, was the final section when the continuing lives of the original five characters, who had expressed their fears, were revealed to us. My particular favourite, was Dorothy, an aging single mother who wondered whether, “The autumn of your life,” has, “the mellow golden glow of early October or the dark gloom of late November.”

As in many of Terry Tyler’s novels, the weaknesses and determination of the characters reflect modern society and drive an exciting plot. An original, psychological thriller.

You can find The Devil You Know at Amazon UK  or at Amazon US

and you can read more on Terry’s blog

http://terrytyler59.blogspot.co.uk/2016/10/the-devil-you-know-is-live.html