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Monthly Archives: July 2016

#FridayBookShare After Dark by Haruki Murakami

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#FridayBookShare is a game created by Shelley Wilson to help search for an ideal read.

Anyone can have a go – all you need to do is answer the following questions based on the book you are currently reading/finished reading this week and use the hashtag #FridayBookShare

First line of the book.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

Introduce the main character using only three words.

Delightful design (add the cover image of the book).

Audience appeal (who would enjoy reading this book?)

Your favourite line/scene.

After Dark is the second book I have read by Haruki Murakami.  It is slim and easy to read but that doesn’t mean that it is easy to understand.

First Line  Eyes mark the shape of the city.  Through the eyes of a high flying night-bird, we take in the scene from midair.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

The midnight hour approaches in an almost empty all-night diner. Mari sips her coffee and glances up from a book as a young man, a musician, intrudes on her solitude. Both have missed the last train home. The musician has plans to rehearse with his jazz band all night, Mari is equally unconcerned and content to read, smoke and drink coffee until dawn. They realise they’ve been acquainted through Eri, Mari’s beautiful sister. The musician soon leaves with a promise to return before dawn. Shortly afterwards Mari will be interrupted a second time by a girl from the Alphaville Hotel; a Chinese prostitute has been hurt by a client, the girl has heard Mari speaks fluent Chinese and requests her help.

Meanwhile Eri is at home and sleeps a deep, heavy sleep that is ‘too perfect, too pure’ to be normal; pulse and respiration at the lowest required level. She has been in this soporfic state for two months; Eri has become the classic myth – a sleeping beauty. But tonight as the digital clock displays 00:00 a faint electrical crackle is perceptible, a hint of life flickers across the TV screen, though the television’s plug has been pulled.

Murakami, acclaimed master of the surreal, returns with a stunning new novel, where the familiar can become unfamiliar after midnight, even to those that thrive in small hours. With After Dark we journey beyond the twilight. Strange nocturnal happenings, or a trick of the night?

Introduce the main character –Enigmatic, solitary, observer.

Delightful Design

After Dark

Audience appeal  Curious, adventurous readers

Your favourite line/scene

All of a sudden out of nowhere I can bring back things I haven’t thought about for years.  It’s pretty interesting.  Memory is so crazy!  It’s like we’ve got these drawers crammed with tons of useless stuff.  Meanwhile all the really important things we just keep forgetting, one after the other.

It’s because I can pull the memories out of the drawers when I have to- the important ones and the useless ones- that I can go on living this nightmare of a life.

You can find After Dark on Amazon here

If you want to join in, then answer the F.R.I.D.A.Y questions and use the Friday Book Share meme. Tag Shelley (@ShelleyWilson72) in, so she can read what you have added, too.

 

#AugustReviews ~because every little helps :) @TerryTyler4

Reblogged from http://terrytyler59.blogspot.co.uk/2016/07/augustreviews-because-every-little-helps.html

August 2016 is Write An Amazon Review Month!

On Monday 25th July, book blogger Rosie Amber wrote this post encouraging readers and writers alike to post a short review on Amazon for any book they’ve read and enjoyed ~ following this up, I’m starting this initiative along with other writer-bloggers including Rosie, Cathy from Between The Lines, Barb Taub, Shelley Wilson and Alison Williams.

The idea is that, during August, everyone who reads this uses their Amazon account to post just one review on one book that they’ve read (but feel free to carry on if you get in the swing!). You don’t even have to have read it recently, it can be any book you’ve read, any time. The book does not have to have been purchased from Amazon, though if it is you get the ‘Verified Purchase’ tag on it; however, if you download all your books via Kindle Unlimited, as many do these days, they don’t show the VP tag, anyway.

Remember, this isn’t the Times Literary Supplement, it’s Amazon, where ordinary people go to choose their next £1.99 Kindle book. No one expects you to write a thousand word, in-depth critique; I don’t know about you, but I’m more likely to read one short paragraph or a couple of lines saying what an average reader thought of a book, than a long-winded essay about the pros and cons of the various literary techniques used. Yes, those are welcome too (!), but no more so than a few words saying “I loved this book, I was up reading it until 3am”, or “I loved Jim and Vivien and the dialogue was so realistic”, or whatever!

Book-Review

Why should you write a review?
  • They help book buyers make decisions.  Don’t you read the reviews on Trip Advisor before deciding on a hotel, or any site from which you might buy an item for practical use?  Book reviews are no different.
  • If the book is by a self-published author, or published by an independent press, the writers have to do all their promotion and marketing themselves ~ reviews from the reading public is their one free helping hand.
  • The amount of reviews on Amazon helps a book’s visibility (allegedly).  If you love a writer’s work and want others to do so, too, this is the best possible way of making this happen.
  • It’s your good deed for the day, and will only take five minutes!
 Off we go, then!  A few more pointers:
  • If you need any help with writing your review, do click on Rosie’s post, above.
  • A review can be as short as one word.  The shortest one I have is just two 🙂
  • You don’t have to put your name to the review, as your Amazon ‘handle’ can be anything you like.
  • No writer expects all their reviews to be 5* and say the book is the best thing ever written; there is a star rating guide on Rosie’s post.
  • Would you like to tell the Twittersphere about your review?  If so, tweet the link to it with the hashtag #AugustReviews ~ and thank you!  I will do one blog post a week featuring these links: The #AugustReviews Hall of Fame (thank you, Barb!).
 August Reviews Hall of Fame

If you have a blog and would like to spread the word about #AugustReviews, please feel free to copy and paste this blog post, provide the link to it, re-blog it, or whatever ~ many thanks, and I hope you will join in to make this idea a success 🙂

#FridayBookShare The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde

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#FridayBookShare is a game created by Shelley Wilson to help search for an ideal read.

Anyone can have a go – all you need to do is answer the following questions based on the book you are currently reading/finished reading this week and use the hashtag #FridayBookShare

First line of the book.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

Introduce the main character using only three words.

Delightful design (add the cover image of the book).

Audience appeal (who would enjoy reading this book?)

Your favourite line/scene.

The Eyre Affair is the first of a series of books by Jasper Fforde about Thursday Next

First Line  My father had a face that could stop a clock.  I don’t mean that he was ugly or anything; it was just a phrase the ChronoGuard used to describe someone who had the power to reduce time to an ultra-slow tickle.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

There is another 1985, somewhere in the could-have-been, where the Crimean war still rages, dodos are regenerated in home-cloning kits and everyone is deeply disappointed by the ending of ‘Jane Eyre’. In this world there are no jet-liners or computers, but there are policemen who can travel across time, a Welsh republic, a great interest in all things literary – and a woman called Thursday Next.

In this utterly original and wonderfully funny first novel, Fforde has created a fiesty, loveable heroine and a plot of such richness and ingenuity that it will take your breath away.

Introduce the main character –Zany, fearless, detective.

Delightful Design

Eyre Aff

 

Audience appeal  Anyone with an interest in literature and who likes the absurd combined with surprising exciting events.

Your favourite line/scene

I pushed open the front gate with some difficulty because of the assortment of dodos who had gathered eagerly around to see who it was and then plocked excitedly when they realised it was someone vaguely familiar.

“Hello Mordecai,” I said to the oldest, who dipped and bobbed in greeting.

Find the book on Amazon UK or US

If you want to join in, then answer the F.R.I.D.A.Y questions and use the Friday Book Share meme. Tag Shelley (@ShelleyWilson72) in, so she can read what you have added, too.

Teaser Tuesday #TuesdayBookBlog The Goddess and the Thief by Essie Fox

Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by Jenn of Books And A Beat. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two or three “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Goddess

The Goddess and the Thief is the third book I have read by Essie Fox. It is described as      A beguiling and sensual Victorian novel of theft and obsession

Inside the cage, within the golden bars there perched a little silver bird, its surface engraved with feathers and flowers, very detailed, very intricate.  Its eyes were two pieces of gleaming jet.  A beak had somehow been engineered to open and close in time with the notes- until the music stuttered and died, which was when the bird’s breast split in two and opened to reveal its heart.  A green jewel in a nest of black velvet.  

Our souls are like birds within a cage, they long for the liberty of the air.

You can read about another of Essie’s books here.

The Brazilian Husband by Rebecca Powell #SundayBlogShare

This year the Olympics will be held in Rio de Janeiro so our eyes are focused on Brazil.  I’m aware that it is country of great beauty but also of extreme poverty with a history of political chaos so I was curious about what I would learn of the country in Rebecca Powell’s book.

Brazilian Husband

The Brazilian Husband is written from the point of view of the English wife, Judith Summers, who is making her first visit to Brazil in order to return her husband’s ashes to his home.  Accompanied by her sullen 16-year-old step-daughter, Rosa, things go wrong almost immediately when their luggage goes missing, but Judith bravely seeks out a contact of her husband in the steaming, busy streets of Recife.  It appears that all he had told her of his life were lies and Judith still hasn’t told Rosa the truth about her own birth.

 

Interspersed with Judith’s account are chapter’s in Rosa’s words.  Bitterly unhappy after the sudden death of her beloved father, Edson, she has become estranged from her mother and doesn’t know how to cope with her turbulent emotions and hormones.  Both she and Judith are looking for identity and a future path in a violent and frightening context.

 

The story is set in 1996 when Lula, founding member of the Worker’s party is standing for election as President.  One of the people campaigning on Lula’s behalf is Ricardo, a sad, handsome human rights lawyer, who knew Edson before he left the country, but at first he refuses to help Judith.   We are taken back to 1978 in conversations between Ricardo’s dead wife and Rosa’s real mother Luciana and the truth of Rosa’s birth is gradually revealed.

 

This book is a romance, both personal for Judith, but also a romance with a country for her and her daughter.  They begin to understand the “saudade” which Edson felt, that mixture of longing, melancholy and nostalgia for Brazil.  An easy to read story, but also a book which captivates the soul.

Rebecca Powell

Rebecca Powell

Rebecca Powell was born in Bristol and has a degree in French and Portuguese from the University of Leeds. In her early twenties she worked for a year at a women’s shelter in the northeast of Brazil before moving to London, where she continued to work for a number of national charities. She now lives in the southwest of France with her husband and three children.

You can find The Brazilian Husband at Amazon UK or Amazon US

Rosie's Book Review team 1

Food and Folklore, A Year of Italian Festivals by Lisa M Vogele

Food & Folklore

Food and Folklore by Lisa M Vogele, A year of Italian Festivals, is a travel guide with a difference. It explores the regions of Italy via the many festivals that are held throughout the country. In each region there is a festival during most months throughout the year and sometimes several during summer.

How often have you visited an area to discover that you have just missed a delicious food festival or a fascinating celebration of folklore? In this book Lisa helps you to plan your vacation so that you arrive at the best time, know where to obtain tickets and learn far more about the people of the region.

Ideally, since this a small black and white paperback to carry, you should link to the website

https://lisalovestotravel.com/

where beautiful photographs illustrate many of the festivals from the book.
I have yet to use this book in Italy, but I am already applying its techniques, in collecting posters about Portuguese festivals on my Pinterest board, for my regular visits to the Algarve.

Lisa.jpg

Lisa Vogele is an Italophile, festival-lover, and travel-addict. Her blog “Lisa Loves to Travel” has been created to share her love of festivals with fellow travelers and enthusiasts. Originally from Connecticut, she and her husband Mark call Colorado home. She loves hearing suggestions, recommendations, and experiences around festival travel. She can be reached at lisa@lisastravelguides.com or follow her on Twitter @travelwithlisa. The “Food & Folklore” series is published by Lisa’s Travel Guides and highlights food, fun, and festivals to help others go local as a traveler, not a tourist. For information about forthcoming books in the series or assistance with incorporating festivals into your travel check out: www.lisastravelguides.com

You can purchase Food and Folklore from Amazon UK or Amazon US

 

#FridayBookShare The Ares File by Andrew French

Posted on

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#FridayBookShare is a game created by Shelley Wilson to help search for an ideal read.

Anyone can have a go – all you need to do is answer the following questions based on the book you are currently reading/finished reading this week and use the hashtag #FridayBookShare

First line of the book.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

Introduce the main character using only three words.

Delightful design (add the cover image of the book).

Audience appeal (who would enjoy reading this book?)

Your favourite line/scene.

The Ares File is the second of the Michael Prentiss series by Andrew French

First Line  Fiona Mabbitt was usually a heavy sleeper and quite accustomed to being in the house on her own at night.  After all she had been an army officer’s wife all her married life and had long since accepted that she would sometimes have to spend long periods apart from her husband.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb

When the wife of the commanding officer of a secret intelligence unit is murdered at home during a burglary to steal a top secret file, a chain of events is set in motion to hide one man’s guilty secret. Michael Prentiss is once again unwillingly drawn into the dark world of murder and deceit. He must discover who has taken the file and recover it before becoming an assassin’s next target.

Introduce the main character – Secretive, trustworthy, lonely

Delightful Design

Ares

Audience appeal   Men and women who enjoy action adventure without too much gore and with a human touch.

Your favourite line/scene

Two minutes later the door opened and two familiar faces entered the interview room.  Chief Inspector Gallagher and Sergeant Lyle pulled out the chairs opposite and sat down.  Jordan forced a smile,   “Well if it’s not Simon and Garfunkel.  No, it’s Peters and Lee.”  Gallagher didn’t respond to Jordan’s sarcastic attempt at humour.

Find the book on Amazon UK or US

If you want to join in, then answer the F.R.I.D.A.Y questions and use the Friday Book Share meme. Tag Shelley (@ShelleyWilson72) in, so she can read what you have added, too.

 

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